How Reading Changed My Life

Anna Quindlen, Author
Anna Quindlen, Author Ballantine Books $10 (96p) ISBN 978-0-345-42278-1
Paperback - 978-0-345-42738-0
Paperback - 978-0-345-42779-3
Open Ebook - 1 pages - 978-1-299-23432-1
Prebound-Other - 84 pages - 978-0-606-31178-6
Open Ebook - 47 pages - 978-0-307-76352-5
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In this pithy celebration of the power and joys of reading, Quindlen emphasizes that books are not simply a means of imparting knowledge, but also a way to strengthen emotional connectedness, to lessen isolation, to explore alternate realities and to challenge the established order. To these ends much of the book forms a plea for intellectual freedom as well as a personal paean to reading. Quindlen (One True Thing) recalls her own early love affair with reading; writes with unabashed fervor of books that shaped her psychosexual maturation (John Galsworthy's The Forsyte Saga, Mary McCarthy's The Group); and discusses the books that made her a liberal committed to fighting social injustice (Dickens, the Bible). She compares reading books to intimate friendship--both activities enable us to deconstruct the underpinnings of interpersonal problems and relationships. Her analysis of the limitations of the computer screen is another rebuttal of those who predict the imminent demise of the book. In order to further inspire potential readers, she includes her own admittedly ""arbitrary and capricious"" reading lists-- ""The 10 books I would save in a fire,"" ""10 modern novels that made me proud to be a writer,"" ""10 books that will help a teenager feel more human"" and various other categories. But most of all, like the columns she used to write for the New York Times, this essay is tart, smart, full of quirky insights, lapidary and a pleasure to read. (Sept.) FYI: This is the latest in Ballantine's Library of Contemporary Thought.
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