Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991

Salman Rushdie, Author
Salman Rushdie, Author Viking Books $24.95 (448p) ISBN 978-0-670-83952-0
Reviewed on: 04/29/1991
Release date: 05/01/1991
Paperback - 439 pages - 978-0-14-014036-1
Paperback - 448 pages - 978-0-14-016894-5
Paperback - 439 pages - 978-0-09-954225-4
Hardcover - 978-0-517-12607-3
Open Ebook - 439 pages - 978-1-62373-012-3
Open Ebook - 448 pages - 978-1-4090-5874-8
Hardcover - 432 pages - 978-0-14-014224-2
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Rushdie calls his controversial novel The Satanic Verses ""a migrant's-eye view of the world,"" and indeed the theme of cultural transplantation informs many of the 75 essays and reviews gathered in this impressive collection. Whether he is analyzing racial prejudice in Britain or surveying an India riven by fundamentalism and politics of religious hatred, he writes as an impartial observer, a citizen of the world. Subtle and witty, these concise, eloquent pieces are a pleasure to read. Rushdie's wide-ranging sympathies range from Grace Paley's stories to Thomas Pynchon's political allegories. He situates such writers as Gunter Grass, John le Carre and Mario Vargas Llosa in a political context. Along with a devastating review of the movie Gandhi and a withering portrayal of Margaret Thatcher's class-ridden, jingoist Britain, there are two resounding replies (both written last year) to critics of The Satanic Verses : Rushdie explains the book's intentions and defends the freedom of the writer.
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