Speaking in Tongues

Jeffery Deaver, Author
Jeffery Deaver, Author Simon & Schuster $25 (336p) ISBN 978-0-684-87126-4
Reviewed on: 12/04/2000
Release date: 12/01/2000
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-453-00952-2
Hardcover - 978-0-670-86073-9
Mass Market Paperbound - 978-0-7434-3374-7
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-1029-5
Analog Audio Cassette - 978-0-7435-1028-8
Hardcover - 416 pages - 978-0-7432-0639-6
Paperback - 357 pages - 978-0-340-64023-4
Open Ebook - 336 pages - 978-0-7432-1167-3
Mass Market Paperbound - 384 pages
Prebound-Other - 354 pages - 978-1-4176-5310-2
Downloadable Audio - 978-0-7435-6424-3
Compact Disc - 978-0-7435-9706-7
Mass Market Paperbound - 370 pages - 978-1-4516-7572-6
Hardcover - 978-1-84197-128-5
Hardcover - 1 pages - 978-1-4712-2927-5
Hardcover - 624 pages - 978-0-340-97720-0
Paperback - 400 pages - 978-1-5011-1008-5
Show other formats
FORMATS
Before he launched his praised and popular series about quadriplegic criminologist Lincoln Rhyme (The Empty Chair, etc.), Deaver made his reputation with tricky, stylish thrillers such as Praying for Sleep and Manhattan Is My Beat. This slick novel is a throwback to those books and Deaver's first wholly outside the Rhyme universe since A Maiden's Grave. The basic plot is simple. An insane but intensely charismatic psychiatrist, Aaron Matthews, for reasons revealed only near book's end, kidnaps his patient, alienated Megan McCall, the young adult daughter of former Virginia prosecutor Tate Collier, and imprisons her in an abandoned mental institution. Tate and his estranged wife go looking for Megan and enlist the cops in their search. Much violence ensues. Deaver's characters are workable but not deep, though there's some psychological probing along the fault lines dividing Tate, his wife and their daughter. The novel's primary appeal arises from its thrills, which are plentiful. Like James Patterson, Deaver writes dialogue-driven prose, in short, strong sentences and paragraphs that demand little from the reader while seizing attention to the max. Tate and his wife are forgettable heroes, but Deaver tells some of the story from feisty Megan's gripping POV, as she fights back against her captor--one dandy villain who delights in conning others through disguise and misdirection, allowing for plenty of plot curves. This isn't Deaver's most accomplished novel but it's high-energy entertainment. (Dec. 11)
The Best Books, Emailed Every Week
Tip Sheet!
MORE BOOKS YOU'D LIKE
X