Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
Visions of Loveliness: Great Flower Breeders of the Past

Judith M. Taylor. Ohio Univ./Swallow, $29.95 trade paper (424p) ISBN 978-0-8040-1157-0

..
Taylor (The Global Migrations of Ornamental Plants) tells all in this compendium of plant breeders, which updates Richard Gorer’s The Development of Garden Flowers from 40 years ago. Based on solid research, Taylor’s stories cultivate deeper appreciation for the flowers bred over centuries. The tales reflect a Western point of view, but refer to floriculture in countries around the world. The first of the book’s three parts deals with the history of plant breeding; part two reviews important plant breeders in Europe (Benary, Foerster, Lemoine et al.) and the U.S. (Ball, Burbank, and Burpee, among others). Part three covers shrubs from azaleas to roses, and herbaceous plants from begonias to marigolds. Taylor omits the histories of irises or tulips because others have written books on those subjects. Taylor, a “snapper-up of unconsidered trifles,” discusses plantsmen and women as if they were fascinating neighbors (her vignettes of the Hemus sisters and their sweet pea cultivars are delicious), and although her anecdotes are blessedly breezy, her encyclopedia is exhaustive. (Dec.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Start a Community Food Garden: The Essential Handbook

LaManda Joy. Timber, $29.95 trade paper (224p) ISBN 978-1-60469-484-0

..
This delightful “handbook” by Joy, a master gardener, offers equal parts sociology skills, organizational principles, business management tips, and illustrated guides for (among other things) planting seeds with the tip of a finger. All these disparate areas of knowledge and skill are relevant to developing a community garden. As the book shows, it is a place so complex that understanding human personalities—as noted in a section called “How to Get Along”—becomes as critical as garden essentials like “How to Read a Seed Packet.” The section titled “How to Hold a Community Meeting” includes reminders about oft-overlooked logistical details as securing a venue with sufficient parking and a children’s play area. Meeting agendas, Joy says, must be precise and comprehensive and include actions items. Fund-raising, work days, group rules, and registration are all elements that must be in place before planting even starts. The section “Teaching New Gardeners” flows naturally into the helpful tips about plants’ growth habits, sun needs, and seasonal characteristics. An excellent tool that cultivates human communities as much as it grows vegetables in group gardens. (Dec.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Microfarming for Profit: From Garden to Glory

Dave DeWitt. Torrey House (Consortium, dist.), $22.95 (160p) ISBN 978-1-937226-38-1

..
As more and more people convert their yards into vegetable gardens, urban farming establishes itself as très Brooklyn, and middle-class incomes falter, many newly hatched home agriculturalists are bound to daydream about turning their green thumbs into greenbacks. This useful, entertaining guide from DeWitt, the prolific author dubbed the “pope of peppers,” gives prospective microfarmers the dirt on realistic essentials for turning a garden into a money-making enterprise. Unlike some starry-eyed back-to-the-land advocates, DeWitt, who has gardened and sold garden produce from an early age, warns readers that a microfarm is more likely to enhance rather than replace current income sources and that sales and business know-how are more important than gardening skills. The author advises on such basics as business plans and sales techniques; profiles a range of actual working microfarms, from flowers to killer bees; and relates hilarious stories from his own microfarming, including a disastrous attempt at cannabis raising. Emphasizing the importance of value-added products, DeWitt offers up some wacky but shrewd agrotourism ideas: Edible Aquarium and Sushi Bar or Beautiful but Deadly Microfarm and Poison Museum, anyone? (Jan.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
My Daughter He: Transitioning with Our Transgender Children

Candace Waldron. Stone Circle Press, $16.95 trade paper (320p) ISBN 978-0-9914474-0-4

..
This memoir and guidebook from Waldron reaches out with a compassionate voice to those dealing with the emotional and practical difficulties of parenting a gender variant child. By acknowledging that the parent’s journey can be an often uncomfortable one, Waldron counters the urge to devalue our own experiences when they no longer match with our child’s current reality. Each chapter has three parts, entitled “Recollections,” “Research,” and “Reflections.” In “Recollections,” Waldron tells the story of raising her son Kai, née daughter Kendra, through his process of trying on new roles and fighting suicidal despair, before finally emerging as a happy young man during his senior year in high school. “Research” provides well-organized information on the science of sex and gender and about appropriate medical treatment for transgender young people, including a discussion of their options upon reaching puberty. “Reflections” returns to the personal, but in universal terms, offering advice on productive things parents can do for themselves, their transgender child, and their other children, and on social issues like disclosure and dating. Waldron’s style is warm without falling into either cutesy mommy tales or overwrought handwringing, tapping into the grief that many parents feel when they realize that their children are people of their own and not just an extension of the parents’ dreams for them. (BookLife)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Superlife: The 5 Forces That Will Make You Healthy, Fit and Eternally Awesome

Darin Olien. HarperWave, $26.99 (320p) ISBN 978-0-06-229718-1

..
Aside from the dubious opening statement that humans are inherently healthy and that all disease is preventable, self-appointed health expert Olien, the man behind the whole-food supplement Shakeology, sticks to the familiar. Operating on the premise that readers should focus on five key forces (nutrition, oxygenation, hydration, alkalization, and detoxification) in order to attain wellness, Olien reiterates what we’ve been told time and again: avoid processed foods; cut back on the carbs; drink plenty of water; exercise; and make smart choices at the grocery store. The book does contain specific tips for implementing these lessons: which foods are best for various nutritional goals; which type of water to drink; recipes and nutritional information for easy-to-make items like smoothies, wraps, soups and salads; and daily exercises, which include going barefoot and hugging trees. Readers certainly won’t hurt themselves following Olien’s plan, but they won’t exactly be pioneering a new path to wellness either. Those interested in healthier habits will ind a few worthwhile tips. Agent: Richard Pine, Inkwell Management. (Feb.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Mindful Diet: How to Transform Your Relationship with Food for Lasting Weight Loss and Vibrant Health

Ruth Q. Wolever and Beth Reardon, with Tania Hannan. Scribner, $24.99 (352p) ISBN 978-1-4516-6679-3

..
Wolever and Reardon tackle weight loss in an inward-looking diet tome that readers of all sizes should find useful. Kicking off with a look at the emotional and environmental factors that push us to repeat the same “mindless” food choices, the book provides thought-provoking self-awareness exercises to help readers understand what’s behind those choices and set sustainable goals for changing them. Part two offers an in-depth exploration of applied mindfulness—the act of being aware of the things we often do by rote, which includes eating—and meditation-based methods to banish diet-busting habits for good. Further subjects like avoiding foods linked to obesity and disease and (re)discovering the joys of cooking are covered in part three. This is not an “eat this, don’t eat that” program; rather, it’s an attack on the negative thoughts and patterns that lead to diet failure. Those who struggle with long-term weight issues may find this approach to be the answer they seek. (Apr.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Food Truck Road Trip: A Cookbook

Kim Pham and Philip Shen, with Terri Phillips. Page Street (Macmillan, dist.), $21.99 (240p) ISBN 978-1-62414-080-8

..
Pham and Shen, the folks from the food blog Behindthefoodcarts.com, took an epic road trip to highlight some of the country’s most innovative food trucks and the people behind them to find out why they do what they do and, more importantly, how they do it so well. While this isn’t the first (or likely the last) book devoted to the boom in food trucks, Pham and Shen, along with photographer Terri Phillips, do a terrific job of showing why these trucks have such devoted followings by showcasing unique takes on classics like Maker’s Mark Fried Chicken from New York City’s Big D’s Grub Truck, as well as innovative regional fare such as a porchetta sandwich with pimento cheese from the aptly named Porchetta Truck in Durham, S.C.; ethnic family fare like New Orleans’s La Cocinita’s labor-intensive Venezuelan arepas with muchacho; and fusion fare like the Peached Tortilla’s pad thai taco in Austin, Tex. It wouldn’t be a food truck book without a dash of pretension, provided by Fried Egg I’m In Love’s Yolko Ono, a hipstery riff on the classic breakfast sandwich served in Portland, Ore.. There are a few clunkers, such as Philly’s Tot Cart’s recipe for G-Parm Tots (frozen tater tots, dried garlic, and grated Parmesan cheese), but that’s the thankful exception to the rule. Foodies of all stripes and tastes are sure to find something worth trying. (Nov.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Ruhlman’s How to Roast: Foolproof Techniques and Recipes for the Home Cook

Michael Ruhlman. Little, Brown, $25 (144p) ISBN 978-0-316-25410-6

..
The first in a series of technique-based books from the prolific Michael Ruhlman (The Soul of a Chef) focuses on one of the oldest cooking techniques known to mankind. Beginning at the most basic level—know your oven—Ruhlman quickly moves on to the 21 foundational recipes that enable readers to fully understand and appreciate the technique. Opening with the holy trinity of roast recipes (roast chicken, standing rib roast, and the Thanksgiving turkey), Ruhlman clearly and patiently explains each step in detail, accompanied by helpful photographs of key steps such as trussing and serving, before moving on to other impressive meat-based dishes such as leg of lamb, pan-roasted monkfish, and duck fat–roasted potatoes with onion and rosemary. Readers may be disappointed with the slim number of recipes offered, but they’ll leave with a greater understanding of the technique as well as its applicability to dishes other than the expected roast chicken. Ruhlman’s enthusiasm for dishes like the simple spit-roasted leg of lamb is infectious and will likely inspire a trip to the market. A fine start to what promises to be a toothsome and highly informative series. (Nov.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Duck & Waffle: Recipes and Stories

Daniel Doherty. Mitchell Beazley, $34.99 (224p) ISBN 978-1-8453-3957-9

..
Oddly choosing to open with a testament to the management company that employs him as executive chef of the titular restaurant, Doherty shows readers just what makes the restaurant, located on the lofty 40th floor of London’s Heron Tower, such a destination. The book follows a typical day in Duck & Waffle, opening with a simple staff breakfast of Greek yogurt with homemade granola and fruit compote, before moving on to heartier fare such as pearl barley ragout with goat curd and a fried egg, and duck egg in a brioche basket—an upscale riff on the classic Toad in a Hole. The concept of updating a classic occurs often. To wit: grilled cheese with ox cheek and pickled fennel; beef carpaccio with foie gras; and the signature duck and waffle with mustard maple syrup. That playfulness runs throughout, evidenced by the Leo Sayer Burger—a play on a cockney rhyming slang for an “all-dayer” after a night of drinking that inspired this hearty burger incorporating garlic confit, mustard, and Tabasco. Hangovers are a recurring theme, evidenced by Hangover Hash—a mashup of potatoes, chorizo, cheese, and eggs—and Hangover Pizza, laced with bacon and a healthy amount of cheese. While there are a few labor-intensive dishes (the daunting asparagus with crispy chicken skin and confit egg yolk, and the Roast Cosmo cocktail, which calls for roasted bone marrow), the majority of the fare is hearty and approachable. (Nov.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Bar Tartine: Techniques and Recipes

Nicolaus Balla and Cortney Burns. Chronicle, $40 (256p) ISBN 978-1-4521-2646-3

..
Chefs Balla and Burns, at their much-praised Bar Tartine, in San Francisco, have transformed the craft of drying all sorts of herbs, flowers, vegetables, fruits, and meats into an art form. They share their methods for creating dehydrated delicacies, be it via oven-drying, sun-drying, or a food dehydrator, and offer a selection of recipes that utilize those ingredients. It seems a very satisfying task to air-dry a batch of fresh red peppers, and then grind them into a powder to create homemade paprika, which can be used in fisherman’s stew full of catfish and egg noodles in a broth of fish stock and red wine. However, some of the techniques are perhaps best left to professionals. Black garlic is all the rage, but to make it at home, the fastest method is to place whole garlic heads in a slow cooker, set it to warm, and then check back in “about 2 weeks.” (Nov.)

Reviewed on 10/31/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.