Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
The New Spymasters: Inside the Modern World of Espionage from the Cold War to Global Terror

Stephen Grey. St. Martin's, $27.99 (384p) ISBN 978-0-3123-7922-3

In this highly detailed survey of intelligence gathering, Grey, widely celebrated for Ghost Plane, his exposé on the CIA's top secret rendition and torture program, updates the methods and tactics of modern spying. Grey moves the discussion beyond the "human factor" to technically superior spy satellites and computerized communication intercepts. He calls spying "the world's second oldest profession," one that has evolved steadily since the collapse of the Berlin Wall, the end of the Warsaw Pact, 9/11, the Iraqi War, and the rise of drones in the early 21st Century. Grey also examines the historical collapse of the French and British empires in the wake of wars of independence, the bitter aftermath of the late 20th Century mujahedeen struggle, and various contemporary terror cells in Europe and America. Readers of Ian Fleming and John LeCarré will delight in the lively anecdotes about bold British agents, including the infamous Kim Philby, the "Cambridge Five" recruited by the Soviets during the Cold War, and the aggressive operations against the IRA to prolong English rule in Ulster. In this current age of al-Qaeda and ISIS, Grey's engrossing, chilling read reveals to readers the fluidity with which the intelligence world must operate. (July)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Complete Muhammad Ali

Ishmael Reed. Baraka Books (IPG, dist.), $29.95 trade paper (448p) ISBN 978-1-77186-040-6

Despite its title, this book is neither a biography nor complete. Instead, it's Ali as seen through the eyes of diverse people, many of whom have not been included in other books on Ali. Reed, a novelist, playwright, poet and academic, writes that he treats Ali "not only as a boxer but as a phenomenon, a human mirror for the sixties, as a cautionary tale for the seventies." But as Reed, who too often turns the spotlight on himself, showcases his knowledge of African-American culture, the book goes on unorganized, maddening tangents about the Nation of Islam, Elijah Muhammad, Malcolm X and the Black Panthers, only sometimes relating back to Ali, and even then it might be about Ali's shady business associations or politics, not his boxing. There's little pattern to the subjects interviewed over more than a decade — Ali's second wife, jazz musicians, a mysterious "Informant X;" by the end, the reader feels buried in scattered detail. If readers are looking for boxing, the book is a big swing and a miss, but if they are seeking enlightenment about Ali in the fabric of history, then it's at least a body blow but one better suited for academia than for fans. (July)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Brave Enough

Nicole Unice. Tyndale Momentum, $15.99 (188p) ISBN 978-1-4964-0136-6

Blogger, counselor, and ministry leader Unice (She's Got Issues) addresses unsung heroes and everyday bravery in her new book. Writing directly to female readers, Unice encourages women to be "brave enough" to handle life's big and small challenges. Two chapters deal specifically with grace. "Brave enough women take grace seriously," she writes, to have grace, one must "approach conflict with love and gentleness." Unice also discusses the importance of courage in tackling life's difficulties. She believes that "facing our limits—our own ‘enough'—often means facing our greatest fears." In all cases, Unice supports her advice with real-life stories and a generous amount of scripture verses. Each chapter ends with a "Brave Enough Pause," consisting of "Our Daily Brave," a challenge to the reader to apply the teachings in the chapter to everyday life, and "Pray," a prayer to end the chapter in conversation with God. Women dealing with situational anxiety or everyday fears will find encouragement and validation in this book. Those who have deeper fears or challenges may be in need of more stringent words of advice. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Reboot Your Body: Unlocking the Genetic Secrets to Permanent Weight Loss

Rashelle Brown. Turner (turnerpublishing.com), $18.95 trade paper (208p) ISBN 978-1-63026-889-3

Personal trainer and health coach Brown opens her book with the statement that "obesity is all in your head." Her underlying thesis is that creating new "neural pathways" in the brain by developing new habits of thought and behavior around diet and exercise is the key to lasting weight loss. What follows is a well-constructed manual, like a coach in book form, to understanding the psychology (which is different for each person) behind overeating and under-exercising, and adjusting diet and activity to lose large amounts of weight slowly. Both practical and well-researched, the book is realistic (only about 20% of dieters who lose a considerable amount of weight can maintain the loss for more than a year) yet optimistic. Each chapter contains written exercises and "character studies" demonstrating how clients have interpreted them. Brown begins by telling readers how to analyze their diets and come up with desirable changes, then does the same for physical activity. Chapters on handling "weight-loss plateaus" and maintaining a specific weight are also helpful. Encouraging without being prescriptive, the book does not tout any one diet or exercise regime. The focus is on tackling obesity, but those interested in losing smaller amounts of weight will also find Brown's suggestions helpful. An essential companion to lifestyle change. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Avenue of Spies: A True Story of Terror, Espionage, and One American Family's Heroic Resistance in Nazi-Occupied Paris

Alex Kershaw. Crown, $34 (320p) ISBN 978-0-8041-4003-4

WWII historian Kershaw (The Liberator) revisits the valorous actions of American surgeon Sumner Jackson who, along with his French wife, Toquette, and young son, Phillip, falsified the medical records of Allied pilots and troops at the American Hospital in Paris to aid them in escaping the Nazis. During the four years of German occupation, the Jackson residence—which was located on the same avenue as the Gestapo headquarters—became a valuable conduit for French resistance fighters, who from the fall of 1940 had been pitted against the Nazi Schutzstaffel and their informers. Kershaw, using war documents and interviews with the aging Phillip, brilliantly captures the deadly cat-and-mouse game between Charles de Gaulle's underground and the Nazis and Vichy fascists. As the Gestapo infiltrate the resistance and discover its secrets, the Jacksons suffer the same fate as their friends, enduring the unspeakable torment of those they aided in the closing moments of the war. Kershaw's sobering look at a family's heroism in one of the history's darkest hours vividly shows what war costs in human terms. (Aug.)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
When Ballet Became French: Modern Ballet and the Cultural Politics of France, 1909-1939

Ilyana Karthas. McGill-Queen's University (CUP Services, U.S. dist.; Georgetown Terminal Warehouses, Canadian dist.), $39.95 (408p) ISBN 978-0-7735-4605-9

Karthas, a professor at the University of Missouri who specializes in 19th and 20th century French culture and focuses on identity, gender, and modern aesthetics, examines French ballet and how it has informed national identity, the reconciliation of tradition to modernity, and body politics primarily through contemporary criticism in journals and newspapers. She argues that ballet was in a sterile, degenerate form by the fin de siècle, primarily maintaining its allure through the exploitation of women. It took the Russian reinvention of ballet for the French to seriously reconsider it as an art form, inspired by new aesthetics, innovation, and the possibility of resolving the traditional with the modern. Men returned to the stage and new configuration of sexuality, identity, and aesthetics evolved. Karthas unearths the history and lineages of the balletic tradition and how it moved from its monarchical roots to the flowering possibilities in republicanism. On the whole, it is an interesting study and a rewarding read in an under represented area. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
That He May Raise

Armond Boudreaux. Livingston, $17.95 trade paper (208p) ISBN 978-1-60489-155-3

Boudreaux opens and closes this collection of connected stories with the same character, Thomas, facing a personal trial. In the first story, "Cain's End," seventeen-year-old Thomas survives a challenge from a wild boar while hunting with his father Ben in the woods near their home in the American South. In the second section the story jumps forward to Ben's marriage to Lisa. They have been married for twenty years and, after many disappointments, Lisa is pregnant but Ben wants her to terminate the pregnancy. Lisa wants the baby, but she suspects that Ben is cheating on her with her best friend, Emily, who lives down the road causing a tragic situation. In the final story, "Apologia," Thomas, now an adult, faces a metaphysical challenge in a conversation about guilt and absolution with an anonymous parishioner. The stories contain many fertile themes—sin, loss, coming of age, forgiveness, and suffering, to name a few—but none is developed fully. Boudreaux offers a detailed account of life in the South, using emotionally and morally attuned characters to plumb the depths of complex social issues. (July)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Master Plan for Rescue

Janis Cooke Newman. Riverhead, $27.95 (336p) ISBN 978-1-59463-361-4

In Newman's quaint yet sprawling historical drama, the lives of a young boy and a Jewish émigré intersect to form an unlikely partnership. Twelve-year-old Jack is suddenly stricken by near-blindness at the exact moment he hears Pearl Harbor has been attacked. When he later witnesses his father's deadly fall into an oncoming subway train, Jack's overwhelming grief compels him to create a magical parallel reality in which performing a patriotic act of valor will redeem his father's love, if not bring his father back. After hearing Nazi saboteurs have come ashore in New York, Jack follows and confronts Jakob, who emerges from beneath the subway car he's repairing to share his story of romance, loss, and eventual escape from Berlin. Within this magically conceived universe they collaborate on a "master plan" to steal the saboteurs' submarine and rescue 23 Jewish children. Featured historical events include Kristallnact (The Night of Broken Glass) and the trans-Atlantic voyage of the S.S. St. Louis (a cruise ship turned troubled refugee vessel). Newman showcases an intricate, expertly woven plot, but the persistent over-explanation of metaphorically significant moments becomes tedious. Nevertheless, a boy processing grief through a reimagining of history is an ultimately affirming tale. (July)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
A Bride at Last

Melissa Jagears. Bethany House Publishers, $14.99 (368p) ISBN 978-0-7642-1170-6

In her latest novel, Jagears (A Bride for Keeps) goes for low hanging fruit by structuring the plot around the inevitable complications of being a mail order bride. Lucinda Riverton is on her death bed and, knowing she is close to the end, sends her ex-husband of ten years, Silas Jonesey, a note asking for money. Years before, Lucinda had been Silas's mail order bride, but after early difficulties decided to leave. Kate Dawson is a schoolteacher in Brenton, Mo., where Lucinda moved after leaving Silas. After entering an engagement as a mail order bride, Kate discovers her intended's nefarious character and breaks off her agreement. Lucinda's son Anthony is a student in Kate's class, and when Lucinda becomes ill Kate volunteers to care for the boy. Silas and Kate's paths cross when Lucinda passes and they are forced to work out an agreement that is best for the Anthony. The characters are all well-balanced and engaging: Silas' struggle with his failed marriage, struggling faith, and dark past makes him sympathetic; Kate's commitment to Anthony gives her depth and pathos; and their romance develops realistically. Despite the predictable set-up, empathetic characters will make the book a memorable read for fans of redemptive historical romances. (July)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
Eve

William Paul Young.. Howard, $16 (320) ISBN 978-1-5011-0142-7

Young (The Shack) offers another mind-bending, challenging novel that will have readers scratching their heads and examining their hearts. This exploration of humankind's "turning" from God offers a unique look at the events of the Garden of Eden as seen by Lilly Fields, the Witness who washed up on the shore of an ethereal place and is cared for by John in the Refuge—and island located between our world and the next. Lilly's life reflects our own—she feels unsure of her place on Earth, and unworthy of God's love. Lilly meets Eve, Mother of the Living, in her dreams. In phantasmagoric scenes she makes her spiritual progression. She is wounded by a mysterious evil that breaches the Refuge, protected by the Guardian Han-el, witnesses Creation, and eventually finds herself in Adonai's lap where she finally accepts his love and learns to trust completely. The novel is sometimes confusing due to Young's flexible use of time and space, but often the writing is stunningly beautiful, offering an evocative, challenging look at our view of God and the Creation narrative . Young's latest will certainly pique the interest of established fans as well as generate controversy. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/07/2015 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
X
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.