Subscriber-Only Content; You must be a PW subscriber to access the backissue database. PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital edition via our app or online. For more information on PW's new integrated subscription plan, click here. If you are currently a PW subscriber, click "Login" for full access to the site (if you have not done so already, you will need to set up your account for the new system by going here), or click the "Subscribe" button to become a PW subscriber. Email service@publishersweekly.com with questions.

Login or Subscribe
Energy Medicine Yoga: Amplify the Healing Power of Your Yoga Practice

Lauren Walker. Sounds True (IPS, dist.), $18.95 trade paper (216p) ISBN 978-1-62203-246-4

Walker combines two of her passions—yoga and energy medicine—in this detailed, generously illustrated, but sometimes inaccessible guide to balancing the body’s natural energy for better health and well-being. While most readers will be familiar with yoga, energy medicine is less widely understood. According to Walker, this field, which includes such techniques as acupuncture, tai chi, and Reiki, is based on the idea that the body is a “living system of energy” that must be balanced and maintained. Combining energy medicine and yoga, says Walker, is meant “to harness our own life force and both transform ourselves to our highest good and accept ourselves in our innate perfection.” Part I offers an eight-week introduction to concepts like radiant circuits, vayus, bandhas, meridians, electrics, and chakras. Walker stresses the importance of each, which may frustrate people looking to address specific ailments. It’s not clear, for instance, what distinguishes the triple-warmer spleen hug from the head-to-knee pose with spleen strengthening, or the hang with gait clearing from the forward bend with meridian trace. Part II includes further options for customizing the reader’s individual yoga regimen with energy work. Though people with extensive experience in yoga or energy medicine should be intrigued, general readers may be daunted even by Walker’s introductory program. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Blue Ribbon Baking from a Redneck Kitchen

Francine Bryson. Clarkson Potter, $22 (240p) ISBN 978-0-8041-8578-3

Baking-competition juggernaut Bryson has won over 200 national and regional baking competitions, so she knows her way around a stand mixer. Rather than keep all those amazing recipes to herself, she generously shares them with home bakers in this imaginative and practical collection. Opening strong with pies (Bryson’s a member of the American Pie Council), readers can opt for butter, lard, or even Bryson’s simple five-ingredient crust as the base for classics like coconut cream pie, the creamy blackberry blow-ya-away pie, or her winter fruit pie, a toothsome combination of apples, pears, cranberries studded with a crumb and pecan topping. Then it’s on to cookies (classic chocolate chip, and her grandmother’s Iced Oatmeal Cookies)before she moves on to cakes and cheesecakes, the latter of which get their own chapter (deservedly so: her prizewinning apple caramel cheesecake is a keeper). Bryson is an eager and enthusiastic teacher, more concerned with instructing readers on how to get things right (they will do well to heed her many tips sprinkled throughout the book) than waving ribbons in their faces. She’s not above including a classic like soda pop cake, peach cobbler, or store-bought cake mix to achieve her results. It adds up to a warm and welcoming collection that’s sure to get plenty of use. Home bakers might as well pick up two copies, as the first one’s likely to get dog-eared and butter-stained in a short amount of time. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Pork: More than 50 Heavenly Meals That Celebrate the Glory of Pig, Delicious Pig

Cree LeFavour. Chronicle, $27.50 (256p) ISBN 978-1-4521-0983-1

LeFavour (Poulet, Fish, The New Steak) grew up on a ranch populated with pigs, and that connection has stayed with her, enabling her to appreciate pork on many levels and cuts. Here, she shares that insight and appreciation with a collection of over 50 pork dishes that span the globe. Eschewing the obvious, LeFavour operates under the assumption that readers have already cooked their fare share of porky classics, offering up recipes for sauteed pork chops with cider reduction and a pitch-perfect meatloaf wrapped in bacon before going above and beyond with dishes like whole yolk ravioli over slow-cooked pork belly and wilted mixed greens with buttery toast and sauteed pickle pears, a dish that sets the tone for the rest of the book. Her recipes alternate between the simple and fun riffs on classics, such as the San Francisco burrito and pork fried rice, and the inordinately complex, such as her belly, root, and snail sew, which calls for very specific ingredients such as French snails and Sercial Madeira. Some of those specific and hard-to-source ingredients like dried black turtle beans and an almost nagging insistence on organic high heat oils may test the patience of readers, but those with an interest in expanding their culinary repertoire and a love of pig will find a lot of interesting meals here. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The ‘Taste of Home’ Cookbook: Best Loved Recipes from Home Cooks Like You

Editors of Taste of Home. Readers Digest, $29.99 (672p) ISBN 978-1-61765-293-6

In its all-new Busy Family Edition, this volume offers an updated collection of nearly 1400 recipes from America’s home cooks, readers of the eponymous cooking magazine. Recipes include everyday family fare as well as holiday meals, all with a no-nonsense, quick-and-easy focus for comforting home-cooked dishes. A chapter devoted to Dinner in 30 minutes features over 100 recipes, including five-ingredient recipes and tips for preparation ease. Another chapter contains illustrated Kitchen Basics such as food storage, the use of cutlery, and cooking terminology. Twenty-one other chapters cover almost any dish you can imagine: appetizers like chipotle sliders and beverages, meat dishes such as rosemary sirloin tips, poultry, and fish dishes like grilled salmon packets; pasta, sides, sauces and condiments; breads both quick and traditional; baked confections; candies; and desserts like scrumptious honey-rum grilled bananas. There’s a new vegetarian chapter of meatless dishes featuring a Tuscan-inspired strudel stuffed with tomatoes, mushrooms, and pesto. Guidelines on what to look for when buying ingredients, basic cooking methods, suggested marinades, serving tips, and charts describing classic cuts of beef and grilling times are also included. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Vegan Holiday Cooking from Candle Café: Celebratory Menus and Recipes from New York’s Premier Plant-Based Restaurants

Joy Pierson, Angel Ramos, and Jorge Piñeda. Ten Speed, $22.99 (176p) ISBN 978-1-60774-647-8

In the third cookbook from this vegan, sustainable restaurant (Candle 79 Cookbook, The Candle Café Cookbook), Chefs Pierson, Ramos, and Piñeda tackle a very specific type of problem: holiday cooking. Broken down into 10 distinct menus for 10 specific holidays, this book uses festive food as the window through which to experience the height of vegan cooking. From major American holidays such as the Fourth of July or Thanksgiving, to more ethnic celebrations like the Passover Seder and Cinco de Mayo, the reader can rip a menu off the page or mix and match to create a distinct flavor. Despite the obvious pitfall associated with meat alternatives or vegetables, unique flavors appear throughout this cookbook’s pages. For example, “seitan & tempeh fingers with sweet mustard dipping sauce” and jalapeno cornbread sticks offer pungent notes while “sweet potato latkes with almond crème fraîche” and “mâche & endive salad with creamy avocado vinaigrette” cater to a subtler, more classic taste. This book will inspire home cooks to add zing and zest to their vegan recipes. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
Mallmann on Fire

Francis Mallmann. Artisan, $40 (320p) ISBN 978-1-57965-537-2

One hundred solid recipes for the outdoor grill and griddle provide counterweight to Mallmann’s ethereal musings of his global travels in this follow-up to 2009’s Seven Fires. A celebrity in South America, with three restaurants and numerous television appearances on his CV, the chef professes that his life has always been about the “passionate encounter between wanderlust and cooking.” Thus, he writes of the lessons learned and fires lit in Paris, New York, Brazil, Uruguay, and Patagonia, at times with a poetic sensibility that could stand a little more wander and a little less lust (“I adore the way everybody has lovers. The French don’t talk about it too much; it is too serious and too beautiful.”) His Parisian training in the kitchen is reflected in several of the entrees ,including côte de boeuf and gratin of potatoes with emmental wrapped in Bayonne ham, but it is clear that his influences are broadly based. There is an Argentinian tuna churrasco and avocado sandwich; a Brazilian octopus with chard, cooked in a cast-iron box; butterflied chicken a la parrilla is served with grilled chicory, as is done in Italy; and, for the American palate, there are spareribs, braised in red wine and served with slaw. 250 color photos, a mélange of seared fish, sliced steak and, of course, fire, add additional heat to the proceedings. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Slanted Door

Charles Phan. Ten Speed, $40 (288p) ISBN 978-1-60774-054-4

In 1995, Chef Phan opened his small Vietnamese restaurant, The Slanted Door, in a former kitchen cabinet store in San Francisco’s Mission District. Nineteen years, several menu expansions, and two relocations later, the eatery is now a 175-seat anchor of the Ferry Building Market, serving oysters, organic meat and poultry, and over 80,000 spring rolls per year. It’s a success story that is hard not to love, especially given Phan’s warm and straightforward prose that recounts the hard work involved and good luck that came his way. He also has a nice way of spinning funny anecdotes, such as the tale of his first attempt at buying wholesale produce, and the story of the day Bill and Chelsea Clinton decided to stop in for a bite. If the narrative is heartwarming, the more than 100 recipes are mouth-watering and, at times, tongue-burning. Appetizers include pork and shrimp wontons with spicy chili oil, and Nem Nuong, which are meatballs seasoned with fish sauce. Main dishes run the gamut from steamed halibut with ginger-lime sauce, to wok-charred eggplant, to a Vietnamese quiche made with ground pork, crabmeat and, preferably, duck eggs. And, affirming his place in the city’s craft cocktail culture, Phan shows off 20 mixed drinks. Most, like the Filibuster, which balances rye, lemon juice and bitters with a blast of dark maple syrup, have more than a hint of sweetness. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The History of Rock ’n’ Roll in Ten Songs

Greil Marcus. Yale Univ, $28 (320p) ISBN 978-0-300-18737-3

In his typically provocative and far-reaching style, music critic Marcus (Mystery Train) ingeniously retells the tale of rock and roll as the undulating movement of one song through the decades, speaking anew in different settings; it’s a “continuum of associations, a drama of direct and spectral connections between songs and performers.” Selecting 10 songs recorded between 1956 and 2008, he ranges gracefully over various performances of the same song, probing deeply into the nuances of each singer’s style as well as the ways that the recorded version of the song reflects its time. Thus, for example, Marcus follows the career of Barrett Strong’s 1963 Motown hit, “Money (That’s What I Want),” and Strong’s harsh and violent rendition to The Beatles’ 1964 version in which John Lennon is “appalled, hateful, and ravenous all at once, and so powerfully the music seems to fall away from him, letting him claim every molecule in the air.” Marcus cannily shifts to a song that deals squarely with the power of money, Tom Gray’s “Money Changes Everything,” and traces the ways the power of the song shifts and transforms in Cyndi Lauper’s 1983 version (she turns it from a “man’s lament into a woman’s manifesto”); her 2005 version (the “only language it speaks is mourning, pain, desperation, and defeat”); and Gray’s 2007 version, which dried up quickly. Marcus brilliantly illustrates what many rock music fans suspected all along but what many rock critics have failed to say: rock ’n’ roll is a universal language that transcends time and space and reveals all mysteries and truths. (Sept.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
#Newsfail

Jamie Kilstein and Allison Kilkenny. Simon & Schuster, $22 (288p) ISBN 978-1-4767-0651-1

Touting the bold message that “independent radio that won’t lead you to war,” comedian Kilstein and journalist Kilkenny tell the tale of their popular podcast, Citizen Radio, with equal doses of edgy humor and insight. The show’s creators, inspired by the pioneering news program Democracy Now, realized their brand of censor-free, low-budget media without the influence of corporate cash would go against the commercial grain, running counter to mainstream media’s focus of “sexy over substance, drama over facts.” Under their mission statement of “truth-telling above brainwashing,” no person or topic escapes their barbed scrutiny whether it’s the “climate change denial cult,” Fox News, CNN, “legitimate rape,” same-sex marriage, CNN’s Sanjay Gupta, Glenn Beck, the War on Drugs and legalized weed, or Jon Stewart’s The Daily Show. When the authors tackle gun control and Constitutional guarantees, they argue the obvious with a wry statement of truth: “Of course you can kill people with other objects aside from guns, but the point is it’s a lot more difficult to commit massacres with objects that aren’t guns.” Feisty, literate, and uncompromising, the work of Kilstein and Kilkenny stresses the role of a free and independent press as a powerful guardian of democracy. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
The Art of Noise: Conversations with Great Songwriters

Daniel Rachel. St. Martin’s, $21.99 trade paper (528p) ISBN 978-1-250-05129-5

Inspired by Paul Zollo’s Songwriters on Songwriting, which focuses on North American songwriters, writer and musician Rachel faithfully, though unremarkably, gathers similar material from 23 British songwriters, including Ray Davies, Mick Jones, Sting, and Annie Lennox. Some, like Davies, see their profession simply as a part of their life: “I still wake up in the mornings and wonder what am I’m going to do when I grow up. Why am I a songwriter? That’s the way it ended up.” Others, like Laura Marling, have no inkling how they got into songwriting, but can’t do imagine themselves doing otherwise: “I think out of necessity is the reason why I keep doing it: it’s a necessary exercise. I don’t know the reason why I started doing it.” Jimmy Page openly reveals his approach to writing: “Coming from the guitarist’s point of view, I’ll start with the music first. That’s the essence of the key ideas and then I’ll work on those.” Paul Weller, of The Jam, “can’t imagine a time when I wouldn’t want to write; it’s a catharsis of a kind; it’s who I am.” For Joan Armatrading, writing is a “very, very happy time... sometimes if you would see me writing you’d probably think I was mad because I’m quite animated: I move around, I jump around, I dance.” These are fans notes that will appeal to those obsessive about the details of songwriting. (Oct.)

Reviewed on 08/15/2014 | Details & Permalink

show more
X
Stay ahead with
Tip Sheet!
Free newsletter: the hottest new books, features and more
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Only $18.95/month for Digital Access
or $20.95 for Print+Digital Access!
X
Email Address

Password

Log In Lost Password

PW has integrated its print and digital subscriptions, offering exciting new benefits to subscribers, who are now entitled to both the print edition and the digital editions of PW (online or via our app). For instructions on how to set up your accout for digital access, click here. For more information, click here.

The part of the site you are trying to access is now available to subscribers only. Subscribers: to set up your digital subscription with the new system (if you have not done so already), click here. To subscribe, click here.

Email pw@pubservice.com with questions.

Not Registered? Click here.